How to Be a Good WordPress Developer?

Pippin has some thoughts. I concur with most of them, especially the one about challenging yourself. The best self-taught developers are those who become obsessed with solving problems. They can’t stop themselves. They might get discouraged and walk away from the computer in disgust. But a few minutes later they’ll think “but I haven’t try this” and be right back at it.

Good developers surround themselves with people who know more than they do. They have no real desire to show how smart they are but would rather learn something smart from others. If you can let your pride go and be ok being the dumbest person in a room full of the smartest people ( as opposed to being the smartest in the room ) you’ll be better than you’d ever imagined otherwise. Plus people will like working with you which helps .

If your looking for a more “skill” based assessment of what it takes to be a developer, this is a pretty good article. Specifically, I like the notion of “problem decomposition,” which is a fancy way to say troubleshooting.

A key aspect of solving a problem ( and thus being a good developer ) is not getting handcuffed by what you don’t know. Obviously, if you knew you wouldn’t have a problem. But just because you don’t know what is causing a specific issue doesn’t mean you know nothing. I often start troubleshooting by clarifying and confirming what I do know.

For instance,  if WordPress gives me an “Error establishing a database connection” screen: What do I know? Do I know my username and password are correct? Can I confirm that by connecting to mysql via the command line or PhpMyAdmin? Do I know that mysql is running on the server?  Again does phpmyadmin work? Does my hosting dashboard have a mysql “status” icon”? Or does <code>service mysql status</code> return something? So on and so forth.

Confirming what you know sometimes exposes that what you think you know may not actually be true. And if it is true, it helps you focus your theories of the problem on areas that really are unknown. Like anything else, the more you decompose problems the better you’ll be at it.